How can the language services help speed up the rebuild of Notre Dame?

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Mike Thompsett Translation, Localization, Translator...

Earlier this month the world’s attention turned to France, to one of the most iconic landmarks in the world.

Notre Dame Cathedral was in flames, and the streets of Paris were lined with residents and tourists mourning the devastation of an iconic building.

Luckily, a large portion of the stonework, including the two towers which make up the front façade of the Cathedral, were saved – but much of the damage was already done and the restoration is said to take years. The sad truth is that it’s unlikely to be restored exactly to its former glory.

However, the following days were filled with good news stories – with public funding and billionaires clubbing together to donate millions of Euros to the rebuild and restoration project – the French president, Emmanuel Macron, has estimated that it will take around five years to complete.

With such a huge build about to take place, it got us thinking about how the language services will help contribute, particularly in the translation side of construction.

As we know at Adaptive Globalization, Translators are necessary in any industry, and construction is no exception – it’s a much more complicated industry than people first think, especially when you consider there are multinational engineers, architects and even multilingual labourers.

You can’t just pull up to a site and start laying bricks and come up with a masterpiece, very strict planning must take place beforehand; case in point for a project on the scale as large as the Notre Dame restoration.

Paris is one of the most multicultural cities in the world, as well as this the Catholic religion also crosses many languages, and construction is an incredibly diverse industry, with many levels to it needing linguistic skills, so a project such as this would actually require more translators than one would think.

What do translators do in construction?

They can cover a multitude of roles and come in at a variety of levels, ranging from the hugely vital translation of important documents, such as manuals, daily reports, quality assurance documentation, architectural drawings or plans of a project to also being on hand to assist site managers, machine workers, and even labourers should they need to be.

With this in mind, finding a qualified translator who can work in the field is essential to ensure swift completion of the project, and using a specialist LSP who knows your industry is key to ensuring that you receive error free translation on time and that you can trust.

Especially with a building as iconic as Notre Dame – a project that will take years and, no doubt, use hundreds of different construction professionals from many different walks of life.

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